PROGRAMME & VENUE

PRELIMINARY PROGRAMME – Under construction

Pre-Congress Workshops NJF 2019 – Embracing The Perineum

Registration fee: ISK 27.000 / Appx: € 194

01 May – Hands-on training

9:00 – 12:00   Course 1
Gynzone: Surgical skills, repair of labia and 1st degree tears
Including: Instrument-tied knots, instrument handling and safe surgery. Needles and suture materials, interrupted stitches. Continuous suturing and self-locking knots. Repair of labia and 1st degree tears on medical models.

13:00 – 16:00  Course 2 – Fully Booked
Gynzone: Repair of 2nd degree tears and episiotomies
Including: Diagnosis, classification, sutures, needles and instruments. Training on medical models. Healing and follow up.

13:00 – 16:00  Course 3 – The course is cancelled
Protecting the Perineum: Hands-on training
Interventional program: Including Perineal support during 2nd stage of labor.  Lecture and training on medical models.

03 May – Hands-on Training

14:00 – 17:00   Course 4
Gynzone: Pain relief for repair of birth lacerations
Gel, spray, infiltration. Pudendal block: Transvaginal and transcutaneous. Entonox, epidural, spinal, thermal therapy and medicine.

Programme

Programme PDF
Abstracts and programme

02 MAY – THURSDAY

Hall Name (capacity)Silfurberg A Silfurberg BKaldalón Björtuloft Ríma
08:30 - 11:00REGISTRATION OPENS - Eyri
11:00 - 12:00OPENING CEREMONY - Silfurberg A & B
National costumes are welcome at the opening ceremony
12:00 -12:50LUNCH, Exhibition & Poster session I
Served in open area
12:50 - 13:30KEYNOTE - Helga Gottfreðsdóttir
Silfurberg A & B
SESSION 1
13:45 -15:001.1 Midwifery models of care I
Chair: Raymond De Vries
1.2 Health promotion in pregnancy
Chair: Debra Young
1.3 Mental health postpartum
Chair: Valgerður Lísa Sigurðardóttir
1.4 Diseases in childbirth

Chair: Björk Steindórsdóttir
Workshop I
1.1.1 (61)-Mothers´ experiences in relation to a new Swedish postnatal home-based model of midwifery care.
Margareta Johansson, Sweden



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1.1.2 (121)-Work situation and professional role for midwives at a labour ward, pre and post the introduction of a midwifery model of care.
Malin Hansson, Sweden






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1.1.3 (76)-Evaluation of a midwifery model of woman-centred care during childbirth – a mixed-method study
Ingela Lundgren, Sweden



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1.1.4 (268)-Stop, think, reflect, realise – first-time mothers’ experiences of taking part in longitudinal maternal health research
Deirdre Daly, Ireland

1.2.1 (168)-Experiences of pregnant women with pregnancy-related online information - A qualitative study.
Marlijn Kranendonk, The Netherlands & Aliët van Veelen, The Netherlands


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1.2.2 (111)-”I didn’t fit in” – Reasons for not attending parental education groups in Antenatal and Child health Care
Karin Forslund Frykedal, Sweden





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1.2.3 (55)-The effect of an unsupervised water exercise program on low back pain and sick leave among healthy pregnant women – A randomised controlled trial
Mette Backhausen, Denmark
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1.2.4 (226)-Birthing in an Electronic World: First-Time Mother’s Experiences of Self-Preparing for Birth
Susan Fleming, USA

1.3.1 (20)-Antenatal depressive symptoms and early initiation of breastfeeding in association with exclusive breastfeeding
6 weeks postpartum: a longitudinal population-based study
Karin Cato, Sweden
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1.3.2 (247)-Impact of maternal adversity on breastfeeding, mood and mother-infant interaction and cortisol attunement during the first year postpartum. Some findings from the Maternal adversity, vulnerability and neurodevelopment study (MAVAN).
Wibke Jonas, Sweden
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1.3.3 (103)-Maternal depression symptoms during the first 21 months after giving birth
Michael Rosander, Sweden



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1.3.4 (25)-You need more understanding - Perinatal and motherhood experiences of Icelandic mothers who are survivors of childhood sexual abuse
Inga Vala Jónsdóttir, Iceland

1.4.1 (170)-Reproductive Trends in Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Denmark from 1990 to 2014
Ane Lilleøre Rom, Denmark



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1.4.2 (179)-Maternal Rheumatoid Arthritis and the Risk of Spontaneous Abortion. A Danish nationwide Cohort Study.
Ane Lilleøre Rom, Denmark






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1.4.3 (95)-The challenges of healthcare encounters between women with endometriosis and healthcare professionals.
Hanna Grundström, Sweden


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1.4.4 (97)-How is spondyloarthritis associated with pregnancy and birth outcomes? A Danish population-based cohort study
Sofie Mørk, Denmark

(198) The rebozo technique – how to perform and why? Introduction and hands-on workshop
Mette Langeland Iversen, Denmark
15:00 - 15:30COFFEE BREAK - Exhibition
Served in open area
SESSION 2
15:30 - 16:452.1 Interventions and organization of care I
Chair: Rebecca Ashley
2.2 Induction of labour

Chair: Ingela Lundgren
2.3 Childbirth experience

Chair: Hafrún Finnbogadóttir
2.4 Autonomy and shared decision making
Chair: Christina Prinds
Workshop II
2.1.1 (64)-Regional variations in childbirth interventions and their correlations with adverse outcomes, birthplace and care provider: a nationwide explorative study
Anna Seijmonsbergen-Schermers, Netherlands
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2.1.2 (83)-Obstetric interventions, trends and drivers of change: A 20-year population based study from Iceland
Emma Marie Swift, Iceland
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2.1.3 (262)-Feasibility of a health and risk categorization system at an interdisciplinary birth unit in Iceland
Berglind Hálfdánsdóttir, Iceland
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2.1.4 (278)-Normalizing Birth in a Tertiary Environment
Linda Hunter, United States of America
2.2.1 (146)-Protecting the Future of Normal Physiologic Birth: Making Sense of the ARRIVE Trial
Linda Hunter, United States of America



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2.2.2 (270)-Effects of induction of labor prior to post-term in low-risk pregnancies: a systematic review
Mette Juhl, Denmark
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2.2.3 (201)-Absolute numbers are important in patient information – with examples from labor induction research
Mette Juhl, Denmark

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2.2.4 (23)-Impact of intravenously administred fentanyl vs. epidural or no opioids during labour on first suckling and breastfeeding
Hanna Oommen, Norway
2.3.1 (78)-Length of latent phase, women’s labouring experience and quality of care during labour and birth
Karin Ängeby, Sweden




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2.3.2 (62)-Intrapartum midwifery care impact Swedish couple´s birth experiences
Li Thies-Lagergren, Sweden
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2.3.3 (215)-Reviewing birth experience by a known midwife: description of a study protocol
Valgerður Lísa Sigurðardóttir, Iceland
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2.3.4 (263)-First-time mother´s self-reported satisfaction with their birth experience - a cross-sectional study
Christel Johansson, Sweden
2.4.1 (181)-Protecting the health of mother and baby and the autonomy of women: on the need to adequately assess interventions in maternity care
Rikke Damkjær Maimburg, Denmark

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2.4.2 (79)-Dilemmas around shared decision-making in midwifery care: how to do right?
Marianne Nieuwenhuijze, The Netherlands
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2.4.3 (22)-Shared agenda making for quality improvement; towards more synergy in maternity care
Carola Groenen, The Netherlands
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2.4.4 (41)-Norwegian midwives´perception fo their practice environment - a mixed Methods study
Mirjam Lukasse, Norway

BLUBB: An interprofessional contract teaching to reduce perineal trauma and to increase the level of knowledge of pelvic floor anatomy and repair of perineal trauma
Malin Edqvist, Sweden
WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS
16:50 - 18:08
W-III(132) EMMA – Enhanced Maternity care for Migrant Families: Research to Action
Helena Lindgreen, Sweden
W-IV(173) “Midwifery educators crossing boarder’s” - Capacity-building of midwifery education in low resource setting
Marie Klingberg-Allvin, Sweden
W-V (192) Midwifery across borders – how can Nordic midwives make a contribution?
Margareta Larsson, Sweden
W-VI(234) The Nordic Network of Academic Midwives
Ellen Blix, Norway
W-VII(280) Bridging a culture gap enhances personal growth except when it doesn’t. Longitudinal qualitative action research of Twinning between Dutch and Moroccan midwives.
Franka Cadée, The Netherlands
18:05 - 19:00SMALL RECEPTION
Served in open area


03 MAY – FRIDAY

Hall Name (capacity)SILFURBERG A SILFURBERG BKALDALÓNBJÖRTULOFT RÍMA
08:30 - 09:10KEYNOTE SPEAKER - Ellen Aagaard Nøhr
Silfurberg A & B
09:10 - 09:20ENERGY SPEAKER
Silfurberg A & B
SESSION 3
Note session 3.1 & 3.2 might start few min later due to changes in the halls
09:30 - 10:453.1 Perineal outcomes I

Chair: Susanne Houd
3.2 Cesarean section

Chair: Ingrid Jepsen
3.3 Intrapartum care for immigrant women
Chair: Marie Klingberg-Allvin
3.4 Theory of midwifery

Chair: Marianne Nieuwenhuijze
3.5 Clinical simulation in midwifery education
Chair: Elizabeth Newnham
3.1.1 (261)-Does waterbirth affect the risk of perineal injury or other adverse outcomes in low risk women with physiological birth? Results from the Nordic Homebirth Cohort Study
Berglind Hálfdánsdóttir, Iceland
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3.1.2 (84)-Severe perineal trauma among women undergoing vaginal birth after cesarean delivery: a population-based cohort study
Charlotte Elvander, Sweden
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3.1.3 (141)-Expert midwives’ skill in preserving the perineum intact: the ‘MEPPI’ study
Cecily Begley, Ireland


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3.1.4 (102)-Midwives’ practice during the second stage of physiological labour: A systematic review
Viola Nyman, Sweden
3.2.1 (191)-Predictors of cesarean in a low-intervention, low-risk population
Melissa Cheyney, USA





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3.2.2 (171)-Maternal physical activity and cesarean birth: a systematic review
Marit Bovbjerg, USA



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3.2.3 (131)-Cesarean section on a rise – does advanced maternal age explain the increase? A population register based study
Eva Rydahl, Denmark
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3.2.4 (165)-Advanced Maternal age and Cesarean Sections - physiology or culture? A population register based study
Eva Rydahl, Denmark

3.3.1 (3)-Immigrants from conflict-zone countries: an observational comparison study of obstetric outcomes in a low-risk maternity ward in Norway
Kjersti Sletten Bakken, Norway

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3.3.2 (7)-Stillbirth in relation to maternal country of birth and other migration related factors: a population-based study in Norway
Eline Skirnisdottir Vik, Norway
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3.3.3 (36)-Global Perspective on Deinfibulation
Heidi Kytöaho, Finland



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3.3.4 (204)-Bilingual doula support – a step towards equal rights for immigrant women!
Ulrica Askelöf, Sweden

3.4.1 (186)-Objectives and aims of midwifery
Mirjam E.C. Peters, Germany






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3.4.2 (237)-Decolonizing Midwifery
Eva K Robertson, Norway





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3.4.3 (98)-Midwives realities in Bangladesh. A focus group enquiry with midwifery students and educators
Ulrika Byrskog, Sweden

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3.4.4 (150)-Does transition to parenthood affect gender traits? The Effect of Pregnancy on Perceived Female and Male Traits
Karolina Linden, Sweden
3.5.1 (59)-Unexpected learning-potentials among Midwifery students in High-Fidelity Simulation
Lea Brinkmann, Denmark




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3.5.2 (106)-Pre-training of suturing skills among midwifery students improves preparedness for training in practice
Kirsten Hasman, Denmark


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3.5.3 (264)-Inter-professional Full-scale Simulations for Learning Teamwork and Skills for Mastering Obstetric Emergencies
Pernilla Stenbäck, Finland
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3.5.4 (130)-Simulation based examination
Helle Vibeke Jansen, Denmark
10:45 - 11:15COFFEE BREAK - EXHIBITION
Served in open area
SESSION 4
11:15 - 12:304.1 Perineal outcomes II

Chair: Maria Hedström
4.2 Labour progress

Chair: Mirjam Lukasse
4.3 Breastfeeding

Chair: Lilja Guðnadóttir
4.4 Midwives' wellbeing

Chair: Ellen Blix
4.5 Midwifery education in India and Bangladesh
Chair: Ólöf Ásta Ólafsdóttir
4.1.1 (178)-Oneplus - Evaluation of collegial midwifery assistance during the second stage to reduce severe perineal trauma
Malin Edqvist, Sweden
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4.1.2 (172)-Risk of perineal tears by maternal birth position
Marit Bovbjerg, USA





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4.1.3 (276)-Association between birth positions and perineal trauma following an interventional program during the second stage of birth.
Edda Sveinsdóttir, Iceland



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4.1.4 (210)-Do more resources lead to improved care and support to women with obstetric anal sphincter injuries? Exploring national, regional and local policies and guidelines in Sweden
Margareta Persson, Sweden
4.2.1 (50)-Safe labour, redefining duration of first stage of labour in modern obstetrical care
Louise Lundborg, Sweden


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4.2.2 (8)-”Management of the passive phase of the second stage of labour in nulliparous women– focus group discussions with Swedish midwives”
Maria Bjelke, Sweden


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4.2.3 (107)-The Labour Progression Study (LaPS): Intrapartum caesarean section rates following Zhang’s guideline and the WHO partograph. A cluster randomised trial.
Stine Bernitz, Norway


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4.2.4 (53)-‘We’ve become very dependent on the technology’: Electronic fetal monitoring and the organization of maternity care
Raymond De Vries, USA

4.3.1 (21)-Breastfeeding as a balancing act – pregnant Swedish women’s voices on breastfeeding
Karin Cato, Sweden

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4.3.2 (66)-The impact of two-sided benefits. An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of young primiparous mothers’ breastfeeding experience
Jannie Skovlund Rasmussen, Denmark
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4.3.3 (211)-Breastfeeding Experiences among Obese Women in Sweden a Qualitative Study
Siw Alehagen, Sweden & Ing-Marie Claesson, Sweden




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4.3.4 (145)-Two-year test-retest reliability of the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) breast feeding questions
Marit Bovbjerg, USA
4.4.1 (94)-The emotional and professional wellbeing of midwives: cross sectional survey in Lithuania
Vita Vaiciene, Lithuania

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4.4.2 (109)-I was completely exhausted and I could not keep on: midwives experience of attending acute circumstances during birth
Sigríður Inga Karlsdottir, Iceland
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4.4.3 (88)-Burnout and intentions to leave the profession among Western Canadian midwives: Is the caseload model sustainable?
Kathrin Stoll, Canada



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4.4.4. (54)-Promoting and sustaining a healthy midwifery workforce – key messages from the Work, Health and Emotional Lives of Midwives (WHELM) consortium
Mary Sidebotham, Australia

4.5.1 (202)-Strengthening nursing and midwifery pre-service education in four Indian states
Kaveri Mayra, India


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4.5.2 (116)-Nurse mentorship: Exploring an alternative career pathway for nurse-midwives in India
Kaveri Mayra, India



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4.5.3 (241)-Capacity building of midwifery faculty to implement a 3-years midwifery diploma curriculum in Bangladesh: A process evaluation of a mentor-ship program
Christina Pedersen & Kerstin Erlandsson,Sweden
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4.5.4 (227)-Capacity building midwifery educators in Bangladesh through a blended net-based master’s program in the subject of midwifery from Dalarna University, Sweden
Kerstin Erlandsson, Sweden

12:30 - 13:45LUNCH & EXHIBITION and Poster session II
Served in open area
SESSION 5
13:45 - 15:005.1 Perineal outcomes III

Chair: Déirdre Daly
5.2 Violence in childbirth

Chair: Jenny Gamble
5.3 Place of birth

Chair: Åsa Premberg
5.4 Challenges in midwifery care
Chair: Lilleba Anckers
Workshop - VIII
5.1.1 (4)-A worse nightmare than expected’ - a Swedish qualitative study of women's experiences two months after obstetric anal sphincter muscle injury
Inger Lindberg, Sweden
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5.1.2 (15)- “Struggling to settle with a damaged body” - a Swedish qualitative study of women’s experiences one year after obstetric anal sphincter muscle injury (OASIS) at childbirth
Maria Lindqvist, Sweden

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5.1.3 (43)-Uptake of postpartum check-up and perineal pain during the first year after childbirth, a Swedish cohort study
Susanne Åhlund, Sweden


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5.1.4 (110)-Build professional competence and equip with strategies to empower midwifery students–an interview study evaluating a simulation-based learning course for midwifery educators in Bangladesh
Josefin Rosengren, Sweden

5.2.1 (108)-History of sexual violence associated with frequent attendance in midwifery-led care
Janneke Gitsels, The Netherlands

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5.2.2 (18)-Struggling to survive for the sake of the unborn baby
Hafrún Finnbogadottir, Sweden






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5.2.3 (17)-Does the violence continue after the baby is born?
Hafrún Finnbogadottir, Sweden




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5.2.4 (209)-A genealogy of obstetric violence and its implications for mothers' and midwives' subjectivities
Rodante van der Waal, The Netherlands

5.3.1 (134)-Women on the move, a search for preferred birth services
Aaroe Clausen, Denmark




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5.3.2 (224)-Birth Satisfaction Scale Revised (BSS-R) Explored: A large scale United States Planned Home Birth and Birth Centre/Center Survey
Susan Fleming, USA, Colleen Donovan-Batson, USA



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5.3.3 (269)-Giving Voice to Mothers - US: Women speak of autonomy, respect, and outcomes of care by place of birth
Kathrin Stoll, Canada


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5.3.4 (57)-“You feel at home – you feel safe”. A phenomenological study of the birth environments impact on fathers’ experience of the birth of their first child
Birgitte Folmann, Denmark

5.4.1 (195)-Risk factors for stillbirth and beliefs: findings from a pilot near miss questionnaire study in Somaliland focusing the mother-baby dyad
Mari-Cristin Malm, Sweden

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5.4.2 (30)-The situation for internally displaced children aged 6 to 59 months in Somalia -A questionnaire survey among caregivers in internally displaced peoples’ communities
Kerstin Erlandsson & Fatumo Osman, Sweden

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5.4.3 (252)-Midwives’ and Public Health Nurses’ Experiences of Encountering Newly Arrived Asylum Seekers in Finland during the European Migrant Crisis 2015-16
Satu Leppälä, Finland
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5.4.4 (126) The Views of Somali Religious Leaders on Birth Spacing – a Qualitative Study
Fatumo Osman, Sweden

(125)-How can midwives support women to work with pain in labour?
Sigríður Inga Karlsdóttir, Iceland, Elizabeth Newnham, Australia & Nicky Leap Australia
15:00 - 15:30COFFEE BREAK - EXHIBITION
Served in open area
SESSION 6
15:30 - 16:456.1 Interventions and organization of care II
Chair: Marianne Keevers
6.2 Antenatal care for immigrant women
Chair: Marie Berg
6.3 Place of birth and fetal wellbeing
Chair: Sigrún Kristjánsdóttir
6.4 Interprofessional cooperation
Chair: Kathrin Stoll
Workshop-VIIII
6.1.1 (155)-The Lifelines NEXT birth cohort
Willemijn Warmink-Perdijk, The Netherlands




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6.1.2 (275)-Birth Statistics 2018 – births in Denmark 1998-2016 from the MIPAC-database
Mette Juhl, Denmark




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6.1.3 (96)-The Robson ten-group classification in Iceland: Obstetric interventions and outcomes
Kristjana Einarsdóttir, Iceland

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6.1.4 (122)-An exploration of women’s experiences of their birth choices in pregnancy following a previous caesarean section (CS): a grounded theory study.
Malitha Monis, Ireland

6.2.1 (39)-The MAMAACT feasibility study - Lessons learned from midwives in Danish antenatal care
Helle Johnsen, Denmark


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6.2.2 (82)-“Pregnant without a residence permit – the experience of pregnancy and use of health services among undocumented migrants in Denmark”
Julia Kadin Funge, Denmark
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6.2.3 (27)-Development of an application for interactive communication in antenatal care with Arabic speaking women.
Dima Bitar, Sweden

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6.2.4 (117)-Non-Swedish speaking women’s experiences of an individual customized visit to the labor ward during pregnancy
Elin Ternström, Sweden

6.3.1 (148)-Giving Birth in rural arctic East Greenland
Susanne Houd, Denmark




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6.3.2 (133)-Intermittent auscultation (IA) as fetal monitoring during labour: a systematic scoping review to identify methods of IA, effects and accuracy
Ellen Blix, Norway

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6.3.3 (225) National survey of routines for intrapartum fetal monitoring in Norway
Anne Kaasen, Norway



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6.3.4 (71)-Women ask for professional breastfeeding support in harmony with the family’s needs
Ingrid Blixt, Sweden
6.4.1 (120)-Veiled midwifery in the baby factory – Midwives marching to own drum - Other professions perspective of midwifery work in labour wards.
Malin Hansson, Sweden
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6.4.2 (185)-MMAY childbirth – Measurement of Midwifery quality from women’s point of view - Development of an instrument
Mirjam E.C.Peters, Germany
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6.4.3 (197)-Midwives‘ Perceptions on Interprofessional Cooperation in Early Life Family Care: A Qualitative Study
Martina Schlüter-Cruse, Germany
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6.4.4 (259)-Labour ward leaders; working together for safer care
Gail Johnson, United Kingdom


(267)-Implementing a screening programme for perineal repair outcomes the first week postpartum.
Sara Fevre Kindberg, Denmark
19:00 - 00:00CONGRESS DINNER - Location Austurbær


04 MAY – SATURDAY

Hall Name (capacity)SILFURBERG ASILFURBERG B KALDALÓN BJÖRTULOFT RÍMA
08:30 - 09:10KEYNOTE SPEAKER - Edwin van Teijlingen
Silfurberg A & B
09:10 - 09:20ENERGY SPEAKER
Silfurberg A & B
SESSION 7
09:30 - 10:457.1 Midwifery models of care II
Chair: Mary Sidebotham
7.2 Gestational diabetes

Chair: Hildur Sigurðardóttir
7.3 Mental health and midwifery interventions
Chair: Inga Vala Jónsdóttir
7.4 Fertility and Preconception care I
Chair: Sunita Panda
7.5 Teaching and learning methods I
Chair: Gail Johnson
7.1.1 (258)-Björkin birthcenter, more options for women in childbirth
Hrafnhildur Halldórsdóttir, Iceland








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7.1.2 (49)-Call the midwife- implementing a continuity model of midwifery care during pregnancy, labour and birth
Ingegerd Hildingsson, Sweden
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7.1.3 (251)-Improving maternal and neonatal health by a midwife-led continuity model of care – an observational intervention study in Palestine.
Berit Mortensen, Norway

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7.1.4 (244)-Enhancing midwifery practice: adapting and storytelling
Alison Teate, Australia


7.2.1 (37)-Knowledge of gestational diabetes mellitus at first consultation in a multi-ethnic pregnant population in the Oslo region, Norway – a cross-sectional study
Iren Borgen, Norway




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7.2.2 (157)-Health literacy and gestational diabetes among ethnic minority pregnant women – A qualitative study.
Ida Dayyani, Denmark


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7.2.3 (42)-A qualitative study of pregnant women with gestational diabetes and their experience of control
Lene Toxvig, Denmark



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7.2.4 (242)-NORWEGIAN NURSE-MIDWIVES`S PERSPECTIVES IN THE PROVISION OF ANTENATAL DIABETES CARE IN AN A OUTPATIENT SETTING- A QUALITATIVE STUDY
Christina Furskog Risa, Norway

7.3.1 (175)-Women’s experience of midwife-led counselling and its influence on childbirth fear: a qualitative study
Birgitta Larsson, Sweden







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7.3.2 (6)-Addressing transition to motherhood by midwives in prenatal booking visits: findings from video recordings
Elke Tichelman, Netherlands

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7.3.3 (214)-Support in labour and childbirth
Liisa Svensson, Sweden






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7.3.4 (274)-„Listen to me“ Women‘s wellbeing in pregnancy and labor after interview intervention „Listen to me“: A retrospective observation study
Hrafnhildur Ólafsdóttir, Iceland


7.4.1 (46)-Midwives’ work with and attitudes towards contraceptive counselling and contraception among women with intellectual disability – focus group interviews in Sweden
Berit Höglund, Sweden




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7.4.2 (136)-Midwives have a golden opportunity to talk about fertility and preconception health – a randomized controlled trial (RCT).
Yvonne Skogsdal, Sweden
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7.4.3 (220)-Important but far away – Adolescents’ beliefs, awareness and experiences regarding fertility and preconception health – A qualitative study
Magdalena Mattebo, Sweden
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7.4.4 (238)-Evaluation of an evidence based website supporting midwives in counselling about fertility and preconception health
Maria Ekstrand Ragnar, Sweden

7.5.1 (161)-Neither clinic nor lectures – but a powerful hybrid learning environment. Facilitating students’ interprofessional and didactic competencies in a student-led clinic offering antenatal classes.
Nynne Ek Sindberg, Annemette Rasmussen & Mulle Nielsen, Denmark
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7.5.2 (127)-Finnish midwifery students need more sexual and reproductive health education
Sanna-Mari Manninen, Finland

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7.5.3 (169)-Perinatal mental health - beyond professional borders
Joanna Andrews, United Kingdom




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7.5.4 (151)-Offering weight management support to pregnant women with obesity: an interview study with midwives.
Marie Berg, Sweden



10:45 - 11:15COFFEE - BREAK - EXHIBITION
Served in open area
SESSION 8
11:15 - 12:308.1 Midwifery models of care III
Chair: Alison Teate
8.2 De-medicalization of childbirth
Chair: Emma Marie Swift
8.3 Mental health in pregnancy
Chair: Sigfríður Inga Karlsdóttir
8.4 Fertility and Preconceptioncare II
Chair: Mervi Jokinen
8.5 Teaching and learning methods II
Marit Bovbjerg
8.1.1 (183)-Advancing health equity for childbearing adolescents: Outcomes of midwife-led care in community birth settings
Melissa Cheyney, USA

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8.1.2 (265)-Caseload midwifery in Stockholm
Marie Ekborn, Sweden









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8.1.3 (6)7-Effectiveness of caseload midwifery care in promoting maternal physical, mental and social health during pregnancy and birth
Jenny Gamble, Australia



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8.1.4 (12) Experiences and outcome of caseload midwifery - a mixed methods study
Ingrid Jepsen, Denmark

8.2.1 (153)-In- or outpatient induction of labour with High or Low Dosage misoprostol – a Danish descriptive cohort study 2015-17
Jane M. Bendix, Denmark

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8.2.2 (257)-De-medicalization of birth by reducing the use of oxytocin for augmentation among first-time mothers – a prospective intervention study
Lise Christine Gaudernack, Norway


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8.2.3 (240)-High-dose versus low-dose oxytocin for labour augmentation: a randomised controlled trial
Lotta Selin,Sweden




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8.2.4 (16)-Postpartum hemorrhage after vaginal birth - why is it still a challenge?
Hanne Lønstrup Graugaard, Denmark

8.3.1 (249)-What do we know about pregnant women and usage of SSRI´s?
Margrethe Nielsen, Denmark


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8.3.2 (260)-Is perinatal distress the main reason for sick leave certificates issued to distressed women?
Sigríður Sía Jónsdóttir, Iceland





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8.3.3 (182)-A nocturnal voyage in unknown waters - Women’s experiences of late-term pregnancy
Anna Wessberg, Sweden





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8.3.4 (250)-Transition To Parenthood: Alcohol Consumption During Pregnancy
Jessica Pehlke-Milde, Switzerland

8.4.1 (2719)-Innovation and entrepreneurship in midwifery: the story about the Hegenberger Speculum
Malene Hegenberger, Denmark

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8.4.2 (239)-Why is conscientious objection to abortion a problem for midwives?
Valerie Fleming, United Kingdom






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8.4.3 (188)-Conscientious objections force women to seek abortion health care across borders
Sara Bäckström, Sweden






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8.4.4 (184)-Contraceptive counselling in the context of an abortion – A qualitative interview study of women’s experiences
Helena Kilander, Sweden

8.5.1 (72)-Critical thinking in midwifery: A model for practice
Mary Sidebotham, Australia



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8.5.2 (207)-50,000 Happy Birthdays – improving the skill and competency of midwives and other healthcare providers to provide high quality maternal and newborn care
Shantanu Garg, Netherlands


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8.5.3 (180)-The implementation of virtual classroom reflection seminars within the practical placements of a primary qualifying study programme for midwives
Annette Bernloehr, Germany


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8.5.4 (256)-Introductionprogramme for newly gradueted midwifes
Mia Marttinen, Sweden
12:30 - 13:45LUNCH, EXHIBITION & Poster session III
Served in open area
SESSION 9
13:45 - 15:009.1 Midwifery models of care IV
Chair: Kristbjörg Magnúsdóttir
9.2 Fetal wellbeing

Chair: Malitha Monis
9.3 Pain relief and mode of birth
Chair: Elizabeth Newnham
9.4 Lifestyle and fertility

Chair: Melissa Cheyney
Workshop
9.1.1 (187)-The physiologic length of human gestation among women planning community birth in the United States.
Marit Bovbjerg, USA


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9.1.2 (236)-Design and implementation of Enhanced Antenatal Care
Emma Marie Swift, Iceland




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9.1.3 (139)-Dutch midwives’ experience of fear and its impact on clinical decision-making
Emma van der Weerd, The Netherlands

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9.1.4 (266)-The role of (mis)trust in maternity health care services: An ethnographic study of vulnerable parents' experiences with being offered additional support in the ante – and postnatal period
Marianne S. Frederiksen, Denmark
9.2.1 (51)-Experiences of midwives performing antenatal cardiotocography in a Dutch primary care setting: a qualitative study
Marit van der Pijl, The Netherlands
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9.2.2 (123)-Mindfetalness- a systematic method for observing fetal movements - A randomized controlled trial
Anna Akselsson, Sweden
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9.2.3 (124) Mindfetalness- a useful tool when informing pregnant women about fetal movements
Anna Akselsson, Sweden

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9.3.1 (104)-To have an epidural or not to have an epidural is it really all just about that?
Sigríður Inga Karlsdottir, Iceland



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9.3.2 (118) Factors influencing decision-making for caesarean section: Views of Irish clinicians
Sunita Panda, Ireland


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9.3.3 (119) Women’s perspectives on the factors that influenced their caesarean section and their involvement in the decision-making
Sunita Panda, Ireland
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9.4.1 (152)-Experienced health after dietary changes changes in endometriosis
Jenny Vennberg Karlsson, Sweden



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9.4.2 (177)-Long-term effects and experiences of lifestyle intervention for pregnant women with BMI over 30
Åsa Premberg, Sweden

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9.4.3 (218) Biological Parents – Technological Pregnancy
Linda Holmberg, Denmark

The Confident Birth ‘SAFE’ Emotional birth Model: how to decrease fear and stress during childbirth
Susanna Heli, Sweden
15:00 - 15:30COFFEE BREAK - EXHIBITOIN
Served in open area
15:30 - 16:00Closing ceremony - Next conference
Silfurberg A & B